San Francisco State University

Coordinates: 37°43′24″N 122°28′47″W / 37.72333°N 122.47972°W / 37.72333; -122.47972
From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia
(Redirected from San Francisco State)

San Francisco State University
Former name
San Francisco State Normal School (1899–1921)
San Francisco State Teachers College (1921–1935)
San Francisco State College (1935–1972)
California State University, San Francisco (1972–1974)
MottoExperientia Docet (Latin)
Motto in English
"Experience Teaches"
TypePublic research university
Established1899; 124 years ago (1899)
Parent institution
California State University
AccreditationWSCUC
Academic affiliation
USU
Endowment$140.8 million (2020)[1]
Budget$354.6 million (2023)[2]
PresidentLynn Mahoney
ProvostAmy Sueyoshi
Academic staff
1,905 (2022) [3]
Administrative staff
1,398 (2022) [3]
Students25,046 (2022)[3]
Undergraduates21,868 (2022)[3]
Postgraduates3,178 (2022)[3]
Location, ,
United States
CampusLarge City, 141.1 acres (57.1 ha)[4]
Other campuses
NewspaperGolden Gate Xpress
ColorsPurple and gold[5]
   
NicknameGators
Sporting affiliations
NCAA Division IICCAA
MascotGator
Websitewww.sfsu.edu
Official nameSan Francisco State Teacher's College
Designated1/7/2008
Reference no.N2378[6]

San Francisco State University (San Francisco State, SF State and SFSU) is a public research university in San Francisco. It was established in 1899 as the San Francisco State Normal School and is part of the California State University system.

It offers 119 bachelor's degree programs, 105 master's degree programs, and 3 doctoral degree programs, along with 22 teaching credential programs among seven colleges.[7][8][9] The 144.1-acre main campus is located in the southwest part of the city, less than two miles from the Pacific coast.[10] The university has 12 varsity athletic teams which compete at the NCAA Division II level.

San Francisco State is classified among "R2: Doctoral Universities – High research activity."[11] It's also an Hispanic-serving institution (HSI) and is eligible to be designated as an Asian American Native American Pacific Islander serving institution (AANAPISI).

San Francisco State's past and present faculty and alumni include 21 Pulitzer Prize winners, 16 Academy Award winners, 49 Emmy Award winners, 10 Grammy Award winners, 12 Tony Award laureates, 4 billionaires, and 1 astronaut.[12]

History[edit]

Graduating class, State Normal School at San Francisco, June 1906

19th Century[edit]

In 1857, the San Francisco Board of Education created the San Francisco Weekly Normal School,[13][14] also known as the Minns' Evening Normal School.[15] In 1862, it became the California State Normal School, the first postsecondary institution established by the state.[14] Only six students were enrolled on its first day. By 1866, enrollment had increased to 384.[16]

In 1867, the principal of Girls' High School and Normal School, Ellis Holmes, realized that the California State Normal School wasn't meeting demand for teachers. The city approved the addition of a new year-long teacher-training program to his high school's curriculum, for girls who wanted to pursue a career in education. This program is what would eventually become San Francisco State University. When the California State Normal School was moved to San José in 1871, Girls' High became the only publicly-supported teacher-training institution.[16]

In 1895, the teaching program was split from the school and became San Francisco City Normal School.[16] Due to a lack of funding, the school closed in 1898.[13] A group of teachers, students, and supporters pressured the California State Legislature to convert it into a state-funded institution.[16]

On March 22, 1899,[17] the California State Legislature approved the creation of the San Francisco State Normal School, with an appropriation of $10,000. Frederic Burk was appointed as the first president. The school rented[16] space in a building on Powell Street between Clay and Sacramento Streets and 31 women were enrolled in the first year.[18][19]

20th Century[edit]

The 1906 earthquake and fire forced the school to relocate from Nob Hill to a temporary campus at the Grant School in Oakland.[19]

In 1921, the school began offering Bachelor's degree options and was renamed San Francisco State Teachers College.[16][20] Teachers Colleges in California received authorization to grant Bachelor of Arts degrees in 1923.[14]

Also in 1921, construction for a new campus started at a property bound by Laguna, Haight, Buchanan and Hermann Streets. The campus consisted of four Spanish Colonial Revival style buildings designed by George McDougall, a California state architect.[21][22]

In the 1930s, overcrowding became an issue at the campus. It had been designed for 1500 students, but had to accommodate about 3000. When the Hetch Hetchy project was completed in 1934, the city no longer needed land near Lake Merced for a reservoir. By 1939, the land had been acquired to build a new campus, but plans were paused due to World War 2. Many students took part in the war, causing enrollment to decline.[23]

During the 1920s and '30s, State Teachers Colleges expanded beyond being only vocational schools to train teachers. They were formally authorized authorized to offer four-year liberal arts curriculums and renamed State Colleges in 1935.[24] So, the school became known as San Francisco State College.[20]

When veterans started returning in 1945, the Vets Village, a housing complex, was built. Some students commuted from there to the campus at Buchanan and Haight Streets.[23]

In 1949, Master's degrees were authorized to be offered.[10]

In 1951, the Gymnasium building was the first major building to be completed at the current campus near Lake Merced. The Creative Arts building was built second. The campus opened for classes for Fall 1953, before it was formally dedicated in October 1954.[25]

San Francisco State College became part of the California State College system established under the Donahoe Higher Education Act in 1960.[16]

In Fall 1965, the Experimental College was started by students Cynthia Carlson, Donna Michaelson, Sharon Gold, and James Nixon, in an effort to teach nontraditionally. In 1927, over 2000 students enrolled in courses offered by the Experimental College.[16] The university's original Experimental College stopped operating after 1969.[26]

Demonstrations of the 1960s[edit]

1967[edit]

On May 2, 1967, 60 students staged a sit-in protest in President John Summerskill's office, opposing the practice of providing students' academic standing to the Selective Service System. On June 22 of the same year, students and faculty picketed administrative offices to protest the California State College Chancellor Glenn S. Dumke's directive to continue providing students' academic standings.[27]

On November 6, 1967, James Vaszko, the campus editor of the Gater, the university's newspaper at the time, was assaulted by members of the Black Student Union.[28] This event became known as the Gater incident. In an interview the day after the assault, Vaszko said he had no idea why it happened, but something was said during the incident about the Gater not running a photo of the BSU candidate for homecoming queen. However, the Gater had included a photo of the candidate. The District Attorney's office issued arrest warrants on November 9 for Ben Stewart, George Murray and Jack H. Alexis.[29]

About 450 students participated in a protest on December 2, against Summerskill and the Vietnam War.[27]

On December 6, students protested against the suspension of students in the Gater incident. During the protest, students broke into the Administration building.[27]

1968[edit]

President Summerskill announced his resignation, effective in September, on February 22.[27]

The Third World Liberation Front was a coalition of the Black Students Union, the Latin American Students Organization, the Filipino-American Students Organization, and El Renacimiento. They occupied the university's YMCA office on March 23.[27]

On May 21, in the Administration building, approximately 400 students held a sit-in protesting various issues, including an end to AFROTC on campus and the hiring of nine minority faculty members. After nine hours, police were called to remove the students. 26 people were arrested.[27]

Students protested again on May 23. On the following day, Chancellor Dumke asked President Summerskill to resign immediately. Robert Smith, a professor of education, was appointed president on June 1.[27][16]

On September 10, George Mason Murray, a graduate student in English and Black Panther Minister of Education, was hired as a teaching assistant to teach introductory English classes for 400 students.[27]

President Smith announced the creation of a Black Studies Department and named Professor of Sociology, Dr. Nathan Hare as acting chair on September 18.[27]

On September 26, after Murray allegedly made inflammatory remarks at Fresno State College and San Francisco State, California State College Trustees voted to ask President Smith to reassign George Murray to a non-teaching position.

President Smith refused, causing Chancellor Dumke to order him to suspend Murray on October 31. On the same day, the Black Student Union Third World Liberation Front threatened to strike on November 6 and presented their 15 demands.[27] The demands weren't met and a lengthy student strike erupted. It was the longest student strike in American history and ended on March 21, 1969.

In December 1968, two bombs were discovered on campus. One was in the Administration building and the other was in the Psychology building (now Ethnic Studies and Psychology building)[30]

1970s and onwards[edit]

In 1972, the State Colleges system was designated "The California State University and Colleges." 14 colleges met the criteria established by the Board of Trustees and the Coordinating Council for Higher Education, including San Francisco State, which was renamed California State University, San Francisco.[14] This name wasn't popular with students and the university was soon renamed San Francisco State University in 1974.[16]

The Student Union building (now Cesar Chavez Student Center) was opened in 1975.[16] It was designed by Paffard Keatinge-Clay.

President Paul Romberg secured a permanent federal lease for 25 acres of shoreline in Tiburon for just $1 in 1978.[31] The Romberg Tiburon Campus would eventually expand 53 acres.

On May 14, 1985, a pipe bomb in a purse was found in the Business/Ethnic Studies Building (now Business Building).[32][33] A US Army bomb disposal team arrived to remove it.[34] In September that year, Coy Ray Phelps was arrested and charged for the attempted bombing.[35] Phelps had also planted bombs in four other locations in San Francisco, but only one exploded at the offices of the local Humanist Party.[36][37] On September 17, 1986, Phelps was placed in a psychiatric facility after being found not guilty by reason of insanity. He was released in 1999, but after starting a website to advocate for murdering Black people and Jewish people, a panel of three judges ruled that he shouldn't have been released in the first place, and he was rearrested in 2002.[37] He appealed the ruling, but his case was dismissed in 2004.[38] On September 23, 2015, he was released from the United States Medical Center for Federal Prisoners.[39][40]

In 1993, the College of Extended Learning (now College of Global and Professional Education) opened the Downtown Center in San Francisco's Multimedia Gulch, at 425 Market St [16][41]

Cesar Chavez Student Center


In 1994, a mural depicting Malcolm X was painted on the Student Union building, commissioned by the Pan-African Student Union and African Student Alliance. The mural's border contained yellow Stars of David and dollar signs mingled with skulls and crossbones and near the words "African Blood." The next week, after demonstrations on both sides, the university's administration had the mural painted over, and subsequently sand blasted.[42] Two years later, a new Malcolm X mural was painted, without the controversial symbols.[43]

In 1995, San Francisco State alumni Geoff Marcy and Paul Butler discovered two new Jupiter-sized planets within 35 light-years of Earth, including one that could contain elements for organic life. They discovered another planet about 40 light years away less than three months later.[44][45]

21st Century[edit]

In 2007, the Downtown Campus was opened at 835 Market Street, replacing the Downtown Center. The campus had nearly 47,000 square feet of classroom space in Westfield San Francisco Centre. The campus was used for courses in the College of Extended Learning and Lam Family College of Business.[46]

In 2013, the Science Building was found to have "unsafe levels" of airborne mercury, lead and asbestos in the basement as a result of reports that pesticide-laden Native American artifacts were previously stored with a material now known to be highly hazardous. As a result of the contamination, over $3.6 million was spent for remediation of the pervasive contamination. University Administration terminated several employees who reported the contamination, resulting in several wrongful termination and whistle-blower lawsuits, including one by the recently hired director. In July 2014, Cal/OSHA cited the university for various health and safety violations in the Science Building, which included SFSU failing to locate asbestos in the building and warn employees about the hazards of mercury.[47][48] SFSU previously ran into trouble with its Environmental Health and Safety program when the director prior, Robert Shearer, was accused of taking bribes from a waste disposal firm in exchange for at least $4 million in university funds.[49]

In response to the College of Ethnic Studies being underfunded since 2008, four students held a ten-day hunger strike from May 2–11, 2016, resulting in one hospitalization. The strike ended when President Leslie Wong agreed to commit nearly $500,000 to the college and meet a part of their demands.[50]

The Experimental College was revived in Fall 2017. One-unit courses are created and taught by students.[26][51]

Also in 2017, a group of Jewish students and local residents accused SFSU of encouraging antisemitism, and excluding Jewish student pro-Israel activist groups from campus activities.[52][53][54] The students filed two lawsuits focusing on the disruption of a speech by Jerusalem mayor Nir Barkat in 2016. One suit was dismissed by a federal judge in 2018.[55] Another lawsuit was settled in 2019 and included provisions for a $200,000 university fund to promote viewpoint diversity, a new coordinator of Jewish Student Life position for at least four years, and an independent consultant to review the university's non-discrimination policies.[56]

In May 2019, Lynn Mahoney became the first woman to become president of San Francisco State in a permanent capacity.[57] Mary Ward had served as an acting president in the summer of 1927, after the death of Archibald Anderson.[58]

On September 23, 2020, SFSU faculty Rabab Abdulhadi and Tomomi Kinukawa hosting a discussion on Zoom called "Whose Narratives? Gender, Justice, and Resistance."[59] The event's speakers included Leila Khaled, a Palestinian political activist and plane hijacker, Laura Whitehorn, an American political activist and domestic bomber. Zoom and YouTube canceled the broadcast due to Khaled's history of violent actions towards civilians. Facebook also removed a page for the event.[60][61][62] The event brought SFSU into a tense national news debate. President Lynn Mahoney wrote a letter about the incident. A second event titled "Whose Narratives? What Free Speech for Palestine?" was scheduled for April 23, 2021, and was also blocked. The event had nine speakers scheduled, including Khaled, Whitehorn, Sekou Odinga, an activist and former Black Panther, and Sean Malloy, an author and professor at UC Merced.[63][64]

In 2022, the new Downtown Campus opened on two floors of 160 Spear Street, replacing the Downtown Campus at 835 Market Street.[65] Classrooms are located on the fifth floor and offices are located on the twelfth floor.

On April 6, 2023, former NCAA swimmer Riley Gaines visited SFSU for a Turning Point USA student chapter event and spoke publicly about her campaign against transgender athletes in women's sports.[66][67] Protesters attended the event and were peaceful. After the event concluded, more protesters arrived.[68][66] Gaines was escorted by university police officers to shelter in a classroom.[68][66] Video clips were posted to social media, including by Gaines, that appear to show protesters chanting, shouting, and holding signs.[68] After the event, Gaines said she had been physically struck twice by a person during the protest.[69][68] Soon after the event, the university police stated that no arrests have been made, and an investigation is ongoing, and PEN America, a literary and free expression advocacy organization, called the incident a "disaster."[69]

Students at San Francisco State University rallied and marched in protest of the CSU tuition increase on September 11, 2023.

On September 11 of the same year, about 300 students rallied and marched against the CSU system's proposed tuition increase.[70] The CSU system is facing a $1.5 billion budget deficit. On September 15, CSU's Board of Trustees voted in favor of the plan to reduce the deficit with annual tuition increases of 6%, starting from the 2024–2025 academic year to the 2028–2029 academic year.[71][72]

After years of declining enrollment, budget cuts were announced on August 31, totaling $11 million.[73] The university is also facing a $9 million budget deficit. A plan to eliminate the deficit calls for cutting the equivalent of 125 full-time positions.[74] The California Faculty Association said it would result in the layoff of about 325 part-time lecturers.[75] On October 11, the CFA held a practice rally against the tuition increase and possible layoffs.[76] On October 26, the CFA and the university Young Democratic Socialists of America chapter led about 300 students and faculty in a rally and march against layoffs and the tuition increase.[77] The CFA led another rally against layoffs on November 15.[78]

Hundreds of students walked out and rallied at San Francisco State's Malcolm X Plaza on October 25, 2023.

In response to the 2023 Israel–Hamas War, hundreds of students walked out and rallied on October 25, calling for a ceasefire.[79] It was part of a nationwide walkout organized by Students for Justice in Palestine.[80]

On November 14, Teamsters Local 2010 held a one-day strike across all 23 CSU campuses, seeking higher pay.[81] San Francisco State skilled laborers marched through the university before joining the picket line at the university's 19th Ave and Holloway entrance.[82]

Students walked out and protested on November 28, in response to 655 courses being cut and over 300 faculty members being laid off in the Spring 2024 semester.[83]

One-day strikes led by the CFA were held across four CSU campuses from December 4–7, including San Francisco State on December 5.[84] Faculty and students picketed against budget cuts and possible layoffs and are seeking a raise of 12%.[85]

Milestones[edit]

  • 1901 – First graduating class consisting of 36 women.[19][10]
  • 1923 – First Bachelor of Arts degree awarded[10]
  • 1930 – Became four-year school[4]
  • 1929 – Grace Hackett became the first known African-American to graduate from the school[19]
  • 1949 – Master's degree first offered[10]
  • 1972 – Received university status
  • 1974 – Renamed San Francisco State University[20]
  • 1975 – Cesar Chavez Student Center opened its doors to students[16]
  • 1999 – Celebrated 100th birthday[86]

Presidents[edit]

Academics[edit]

San Francisco State University's library

The university operates on a semester calendar. Students generally enroll in courses during the Fall and Spring semesters, but courses are also offered during the Summer semester and Winter session.[94] Winter courses are not eligible for financial aid.[95]

The student-faculty ratio at SFSU is 23:1, and 27.1 percent of its classes have fewer than 20 students.[96]

The university's seven colleges are:

  • College of Liberal & Creative Arts[97]
  • Lam Family College of Business[98]
  • College of Ethnic Studies[99]
  • College Health and Social Sciences[100]
  • College of Science and Engineering[101]
  • Graduate College of Education[102]
  • College of Professional & Global Education (formerly College of Extended Learning)[103]

In Fall 2022, the university had 1,905 instructional faculty, of which 807 (or 42 percent) were tenured or on the tenure track.[10]

Undergraduate programs[edit]

SFSU offers 119 bachelor's degree programs across five colleges: College of Liberal & Creative Arts, Lam Family College of Business, College of Ethnic Studies, College Health and Social Sciences, and College of Science and Engineering.

The most popular undergraduate majors are Business Administration, Biology, Kinesiology, Engineering, English, Communication Studies, Psychology, Criminal Justice Studies, Sociology, and Cinema.[104]

Experimental College[edit]

The original Experimental College, known as E.C., was created in 1965 and lasted until 1969. The revived Experimental College, also known as EXCO, allows students to create curriculums and teach one-unit courses about any topic.[26]It's similar to Oberlin College's ExCo program and University of California, Berkeley's DeCal program. Recent course offerings include BDSM 101, Lucid Dreaming, Adventures in SF, Thematic Analysis of Studio Ghibli Films, and United States Foster System.[105][106] EXCO is part of the Department of Undergraduate Education and Academic Planning.[107]

Blended Master's programs[edit]

SFSU offers 34 blended bachelor's and master's degree programs, called San Francisco State Scholars programs.[108] The programs provide students an accelerated path to a graduate degree by allowing students to earn graduate credit while in their junior and/or senior years.

Graduate and professional programs[edit]

The university offers 105 master's degree programs across six colleges: College of Liberal & Creative Arts, Lam Family College of Business, College of Ethnic Studies, College Health and Social Sciences, College of Science and Engineering, and Graduate College of Education.[109]

The Graduate College of Education offers two doctoral programs: Ph.D in special education, in partnership with University of California, Berkeley and Ed.D in Educational Leadership.[110]

The College of Health and Social Sciences offers a DPT program in partnership with University of California, San Francisco.

The Graduate College of Education also offers 22 teaching credential programs.[9]

Accreditation[edit]

The university is accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges Commission for Senior Colleges and Universities.[111] The College of Business is accredited by the Association to Advance Collegiate Schools of Business (AACSB International).[112] The School of Engineering is accredited by the Accreditation Board for Engineering and Technology (ABET).[113]

Admissions and enrollment[edit]

In Fall 2022, SFSU's total enrollment was 25,046. This included 21,868 undergraduate students and 3,178 postgraduate students. In-state students comprised 96% of undergraduate students enrolled at the university.[114]

SFSU uses Cal State Apply, the centralized application system for all 23 CSU campuses. There is a $70 fee per application, but fee waivers are available.[115]

The university does not use school rank, personal statements and essays, letters of recommendation, legacy status, or standardized test scores in the admissions process.[116]

Fall Admissions Data
  2023 2022 2021 2020 2019 2018 2017 2016 2015 2014 2013 2012 2011 2010
Applicants 31,924 30,966 27,777 31,429 34,631 35,605 34,521 36,220 35,121 31,963 34,929 31,461 30,096 29,395
Admits 28,719 28,180 25,782 26,431 23,310 25,550 24,327 24,703 23,841 21,088 20,889 20,070 19,569 18,401
Admit rate 90% 91% 92.8% 84.1% 67.3% 71.8% 70.5% 68.2% 67.9% 66% 59.8% 63.8% 65% 62.6%
Enrolled 2,984 3,339 3,148 2,779 3,689 4,286 4,323 3,570 4,259 3,751 3,611 3,785 3,537 3,659




Rankings and distinctions[edit]

In 2020, SFSU was ranked the 19th top university in the United States by PayScale and CollegeNET's Social Mobility Index university rankings.[124] In 2022, the Philosophical Gourmet Report listed San Francisco State University as one of the top eight universities to earn a terminal MA in philosophy.[125] SFSU was one of the first California State University campuses to offer a doctorate of education. It was also instrumental in the establishment of the International University of Kyrgyzstan (1993).[126] The university is the only one in California to offer a bachelor's degree in technical and professional writing.[126] It is also the only university in the California State University system to offer a master's degree in Classics.[127]

In 2011, SFSU ranked 18th among the top 20 undergraduate schools whose alumni went on to be admitted to the State Bar; many subsequently ran for public office.[128] The university's College of Extended Learning offers the only American Bar Association-approved paralegal studies program in San Francisco.[126]

The Cinema Department, in the College of Liberal & Creative Arts, was named one of the world's best film schools by Variety in 2019.[129] SFSU was also listed as one of the nation's top 25 film schools by The Hollywood Reporter, having produced many leading filmmakers, with over 13 Academy Award wins among its alumni.[130][128]

The Sutro Library, located within the J. Paul Leonard Library, houses the largest collection of genealogical records west of Salt Lake City.[131]

Demographics[edit]

Undergraduate demographics as of Fall 2022[114]
Race and ethnicity Total
Hispanic 38% 38
 
Asian 24% 24
 
White 15% 15
 
Foreign national 4% 4
 
Black 6% 6
 
Pacific Islander 1% 1
 
Other[a] 10% 10
 
Economic diversity
Low-income[b] 48% 48
 
Affluent or middle-class[c] 52% 52
 

In 2021, SFSU was ranked fifth for diversity nationwide and third for diversity in the western U.S. by the Wall Street Journal.[132][133]

SFSU has the second largest Asian and Filipino American enrollment percentage in the CSU system.[134]

Main campus buildings[edit]

Academic buildings[135][edit]

Business Building
  • Burk Hall (BH)
  • Business (BUS)
  • Creative Arts (CA)
  • Ethnic Studies & Psychology (EP)
  • Fine Arts (FA)
  • Health & Social Sciences (HSS)
  • Hensill Hall (HH)
  • Humanities (HUM)
  • Liberal and Creative Arts (LCA)
  • J. Paul Leonard Library (LIB)
  • Science (SCI)
  • Science & Engineering Innovation Center (Under construction)[136]
  • Sutro Library (in LIB)
  • Thornton Hall (TH)
  • Marcus Hall (MH)

Residence buildings, communities, and services[135][edit]

The Village at Centennial Square is one of San Francisco State University's housing communities.
  • City Eats Dining Center (DC)[137][138]
  • Manzanita Square (MZS)[139]
  • Mary Park Hall (MPH)[140]
  • Mary Ward Hall (MWH)[140]
  • Towers Junior Suites (TJS)[141]
  • The Towers at Centennial Square (TCS)[142]
  • The Village at Centennial Square (VCS)[143]
  • University Park North (UPN)[144]
  • University Park South (UPS)[145]
  • West Campus Green Residential Building (Under construction)[146]

A dormitory building, Verducci Hall, was imploded in 1999, having sustained damage from the 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake.[147]

Conference and event facilities[135][edit]

  • Seven Hills Conference Center[148]
  • Student Life Events Center/Annex I (SLEC)[149]
  • Towers Conference Center (TCONF)[150]

Student and administrative services[135][edit]

Inside Cesar Chavez Student Center
  • Administration (ADM)
  • Cesar Chavez Student Center (CCSC)[151]
  • Corporation Yard (CYD)
  • Gator Health Center (Under construction)[146]
  • Early Childhood Education Center (formerly Child Care Center) (A.S. ECEC)[152]
  • Mashouf Wellness Center (MWC)
  • Student Health Center (SHS)
  • Student Services (SSB)

Athletic facilities[135][edit]

Gallery[edit]

Satellite campuses[edit]

In addition to the main campus, the university also has three satellite campuses.

Downtown Campus (DTC)[edit]

A classroom at the Downtown Campus

The Downtown Campus located 160 Spear Street, in San Francisco, California.[153] It's used and managed by the Lam Family College of Business and the College of Professional & Global Education (formerly College of Extended Learning). Classrooms are located on the fifth floor and offices are on the twelfth floor.[153][154] The campus is approximately 15,850 square feet.[10]

SF State has maintained facilities in Downtown San Francisco since the 1950s. The current Downtown Campus replaces the previous, underused campus that was located in the San Francisco Centre.[155] The old Downtown Campus was a replacement for the Downtown Center located at 425 Market Street.[41]

The campus has a student lounge, a computer lab, and study rooms.[156]

Sierra Nevada Field Campus (SNFC)[edit]

The 7.1-acre Sierra Nevada Field Campus is located in Sierra County, near Yuba Pass and the Sierra Valley, at 35400 Hwy 49 in Calpine, California.[10] It's over 200 miles north of the main campus.[157] The current director of the campus is Darrow Feldstein.[158]

The campus offers three to seven-day courses and workshops to students as well as the general public.[159][160] Accredited, one-unit courses are processed by the College of Professional & Global Education. Workshops are not for credit and processed by the University Corporation.[160] The campus is also used for research by graduate students of the College of Science and Engineering.[161]

Due to its remote location, there is no cell service and extremely limited internet access at the campus. Accommodations at the campus consist of tents with mattresses. Students and visitors can to bring their own tents or vehicles to sleep in, or stay off campus.[162][163] The campus has a moderately high elevation of about 5522 feet or 1683 meters.[164][165]

The campus is supported by Friends of Sierra Nevada Field Campus, a non-profit organization.[166]

Buildings[edit]

There are three buildings at the campus.[167]

  • Director's Cabin
  • Staff Cabin
  • Dining Hall

Romberg Tiburon Campus (RTC)[edit]

A pier at the Romberg Tiburon Campus

The Romberg Tiburon Campus is a 53.7-acre research campus located in Marin County, at 3150 and 3152 Paradise Drive in Tiburon, California. It's home to the only marine and environmental science lab on San Francisco Bay.[10][168] Katharyn Boyer is the interim executive director of the Estuary & Ocean Science Center and manages the campus.[169][170]

The Smithsonian Environmental Research Center and the offices for the San Francisco Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve are also located there.[171]

Research vessels at the Romberg Tiburon Campus

The campus was a former U.S. Navy base. SF State has operated a marine lab on the site since 1978, when it began acquiring the land from the federal government for $1, under the condition that the site be used for education.[16][171]

A master plan is being currently being drafted for the campus. It has never had a master plan formally prepared and adopted by the campus or the CSU Board of Trustees. An approved master plan and certified environmental impact statement are required before the university can begin significant construction projects at the campus.[172][173]

The campus is at risk of closing due to financial struggles.[171][170]

Buildings[edit]

Inside Delta Hall

There are eight occupied buildings at the campus.[174][175]

  • Bay Conference Center (BCC)[176]
  • Delta Hall
  • Estuary Hall
  • Farallon Hall
  • Greenhouse
  • Ohrenschall Guest House
  • N. Barracks
  • S. Barracks

Athletics[edit]

San Francisco State Gators wordmark

The university's intercollegiate athletics teams, the Gators, compete in NCAA Division II and are a member of the California Collegiate Athletic Association (wrestling competes in the Rocky Mountain Athletic Conference). SF State fields twelve sports: men's and women's cross country, men's and women's soccer, women's volleyball, men's and women's basketball, men's baseball, wrestling, indoor track and field, outdoor track and field and softball.

The Gators have also produced thirteen National Football League players, including Billy Baird, Elmer Collett, Maury Duncan, Carl Kammerer, Douglas Parrish, and Floyd Peters. Mike Holmgren got his collegiate coaching start as the team's Offensive Coordinator in 1981. The football program ended in 1995.

SF State has produced three Major League Baseball players, two of which became All-Stars (former Mets shortstop Bud Harrelson, and former Brewers and Red Sox outfielder Tommy Harper). The soccer program has had one player enter the professional ranks. Jared MacLane played in the soccer Professional First Division in Santa Cruz, Bolivia.

SF State Wrestling sent a wrestler to a national championship meet every year from 1963–64 to 2016–17.[177]

As of 2019, the Gators have earned one NCAA team championship at the Division II level, a 1997 wrestling championship.[178][179]

Mascot[edit]

In the early 20th century, collegiate sports at SF State became more popular, creating a need for a team name. The university's newspaper at the time, the Bay Leaf, asked for suggestions for a mascot. Students suggested an alligator named "Golden Gater" in reference to the Golden Gate.[180] Students voted in favor of the name, but after numerous misspellings by the newspaper, use of "Golden Gator" stuck. The mascot's name was eventually shortened to the Gator.[181][182] In 2023, the Gator became Alli the Gator and was redesigned.[183]

Intramural Sports[edit]

Intramural sports at SF State include indoor soccer, costume dodgeball, and badminton.[184]

Sport Clubs[edit]

Sport clubs are student organizations that exist to develop and promote interest in sports.[185] As of 2023, there are 16 sport clubs at the university, including Judo club, Ultimate Frisbee club, and Cheer club.[186]

Student life and traditions[edit]

As of 2023, SFSU has 247 formally recognized student organizations.[187] In order to receive funding, student organizations must be formally recognized by the Office of Student Activities & Events.[188]

49 Greek life organizations are formally recognized[189] and include chapters of Alpha Phi, Sigma Pi Alpha, and Phi Sigma Sigma.

Housing[edit]

SFSU has three on-campus housing neighborhoods: the Central Neighborhood, the North Neighborhood, and the South Neighborhood. These neighborhoods are further divided into housing communities.[190] Also Parkmerced, a planned neighborhood consisting of high-rise and low-rise apartments, is located to the south of the university.

First-year student accommodations[edit]

The Village at Centennial Square is part of the Central Neighborhood

The Central Neighborhood consists of housing for first-year students. There are two residence halls available: Mary Ward Hall and Mary Park Hall. They're colloquially known as the Maries. In the Fall 2024 semester, a new residence hall will be completed and open to students.[146] The Towers at Centennial Square has full and partial high-rise suites. The Village at Centennial Square has apartments. The difference between suites and apartments is that apartments are available to be leased year-round, but suites are only available during the academic year.

Non-first-year student accommodations[edit]

The North Neighborhood has high-rise and low-rise garden apartments in the University Park North community. This neighborhood is closest to Stonestown Galleria, a shopping mall.

The South Neighborhood consists of University Park South and Manzanita Square. University Park South offers townhome-style apartments. Manzanita Square is a LEED Gold certified apartment building. It's owned and operated by American Campus Communities.[191]

Health[edit]

Student Health Services[edit]

Student Health Services, or SHS, operates out of the Student Health Center. Primary care, vaccinations, x-rays, pharmacy services, and gynecological services, are some of the services provided. Many of the services are low-cost or provided at no charge.[192][193] Every CSU campus has Student Health Services.[194] Students who are eligible for services at SFSU can receive services at other campuses, at no additional charge.[195] SHS is accredited by the Accreditation Association for Ambulatory Health Care.[192]

Counseling and Psychological Services[edit]

Counseling and Psychological Services, or CAPS, operates of the Student Services Building. Professional, licensed therapists provide personal counseling, group counseling and workshops, crisis counseling, and telepsychiatry.[196][197] Mental health professionals supervise the Peggy H. Smith Graduate Training Clinic, which is sponsored by CAPS and provides individual, couples, and group counseling.[198][199]

Basic Needs Initiatives[edit]

The Basic Needs Initiatives include programs that provide emergency meal cards that can be used at City Eats Dining Center, free diapering supplies, free personal care kits, one-time emergency funding for students experiencing financial crises.[200][201] The Zen Den pilot program was launched in 2019 to provide students sleep stations in mornings and afternoons. It was suspended due to the COVID-19 pandemic.[202] The university has five lactation rooms.[203]

  • Mashouf Wellness Center, room 115
  • Marcus Hall, room T336
  • Cesar Chavez Student Center, room T116
  • Administration Building, room 229
  • J. Paul Leonard Library, room 26
Inside Mashouf Wellness Center

Recreation[edit]

The main recreation facility at SF State is Mashouf Wellness Center opened in 2017.[204] It's named after Manny Mashouf, who donated $10 million towards the $86.5 million construction costs.[205] The LEED Platinum certified, 118,700-square-foot facility features two heated pools, a hot tub, a sauna, a 41-foot climbing wall, fitness studios, exercise equipment, an indoor running track, a racquetball court, a two basketball courts, a multipurpose activities court.[204][206][207]

In addition, the university's Gymnasium building has a pool. The building is mostly used for basketball, volleyball, badminton, and indoor soccer events.[208]

The Campus Recreation department hosts student-led camping, hiking, and climbing trips, called Gator Outdoor Adventures. The trips are one to four days long and have varying levels of difficulty.[209][210]

Associated Students[edit]

The top of Cesar Chavez Student Center at night

The student government of San Francisco State is known as Associated Students Inc. of SF State.[211] Associated Students provides funding for student organizations and operates the Cesar Chavez Student Center, the Early Childhood Education Center, two food pantry programs, a weekly farmers' market, and many other programs.[211][212]

The Cesar Chavez Student Center is where the bookstore and many of the university's restaurants are located. Event spaces in the building include Rosa Parks A–C, Rigoberta Menchú Hall, and Jack Adams Hall.[213] There's also a prayer and reflection room.[214]

Inside Cesar Chavez Student Center

The art gallery in the Cesar Chavez Student Center is staffed by students and features work by students, faculty, and other artists. There are eight to ten exhibits and pop-up shows per year. In addition, monthly receptions are hosted during the Fall and Spring semesters.[215]

The Early Childhood Education Center provides year-round childcare services, primarily for parents who are students of the university. Childcare tuition is determined on a sliding scale. Student parents are charged less than non-student parents.[216]

A walk-in food pantry program is available on Mondays, Tuesdays, and Wednesdays. A reservation-only food pantry program called Gator Groceries is available on Thursdays and Fridays.[217]

Every Thursday, from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m., the Associated Students Farmers Market is hosted between the Humanities and Fine Arts buildings.[218]

Associated Students hosted the annual San Francisco State College Folk Festival from 1962 to 1970.[219][220][221][222]The 2nd Annual Folk Festival included Jerry Garcia and Robert Hunter.[223]

GatorFest![edit]

At the start of every academic year, the university hosts GatorFest!, a collection of events spanning August through October. Events include tours of San Francisco, student organization events, and food tastings.[224][225]

Media[edit]

Golden Gate Xpress[edit]

Golden Gate Xpress is the university's online newspaper and publishes stories almost daily, year-round.[226] The university's newspaper has changed names several times, but its history can be traced back to 1927.[227] The paper is managed and operated by Journalism students.[228]

Xpress Magazine[edit]

Xpress Magazine is published during the Fall and Spring semesters. Four issues are published per semester, two of which are also printed. The magazine was originally known as Prism and dates back December 1969. In October 1999, the magazine was published for the first time under its current name.[229] The magazine is managed and operated by Journalism students.[228]

Radio Station[edit]

KSFS is a college radio station run by Broadcast and Electronic Communication Arts (BECA) students, streaming online, at 100.7 on Comcast Cable radio in San Francisco, and at 88.1 FM near or at the main campus.[230][231]

Alumni Magazine[edit]

SF State Magazine is published by the university's Strategic Marketing and Communications department. The semiannual publication is mailed to over 80,000 alumni.[232][233]

Literary Journals[edit]

The university's Department of Creative Writing runs two publications.[234]

Fourteen Hills[edit]

Creative Writing graduate students have published Fourteen Hills, an international literary journal, since 1994.[235]

Transfer Magazine[edit]

Since 1950, undergraduate students in the Creative Writing department have published Transfer Magazine, featuring literature and art by SFSU students.[236][237]

Women and Gender Studies Publications[edit]

Since 2006, capstone students of the Women and Gender Studies department have created semesterly publications.[238]

Notable faculty and alumni[edit]

See also[edit]

Notes[edit]

  1. ^ Other consists of Multiracial Americans & those who prefer to not say.
  2. ^ The percentage of students who received an income-based federal Pell grant intended for low-income students.
  3. ^ The percentage of students who are a part of the American middle class at the bare minimum.

References[edit]

  1. ^ As of June 30, 2020. U.S. and Canadian Institutions Listed by Fiscal Year 2020 Endowment Market Value and Change in Endowment Market Value from FY19 to FY20 (Report). National Association of College and University Business Officers and TIAA. February 19, 2021. Retrieved February 20, 2021.
  2. ^ As of August 31, 2023. "University Budget Committee August 31, 2023 Presentation" (PDF). San Francisco State University. 2023.
  3. ^ a b c d e "SF State Facts". San Francisco State University. 2022.
  4. ^ a b SF State Facts 2009–2010, San Francisco State University
  5. ^ "Color System | Identity System Guidelines". Logo.sfsu.edu. July 14, 2015. Retrieved October 20, 2015.
  6. ^ "San Francisco State Teacher's College Historical landmark". California State Parks Office of Historic preservation. Retrieved September 20, 2023.
  7. ^ "Search CSU Degrees". Degrees.calstate.edu. Retrieved February 5, 2014.
  8. ^ "Doctoral Programs | Graduate College of Education". gcoe.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 25, 2023.
  9. ^ a b "Credential Programs | Graduate College of Education". gcoe.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 25, 2023.
  10. ^ a b c d e f g h i "SF State Facts | Strategic Marketing and Communications". marcomm.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 23, 2023.
  11. ^ "San Francisco State University". Indiana University. 2022. Retrieved February 18, 2022.
  12. ^ "About the University". San Francisco State University. 2022. Retrieved April 26, 2022.
  13. ^ a b "Which Came First?: San Francisco State or San Jose State?". www.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 25, 2023.
  14. ^ a b c d "History | CSU". www.calstate.edu. Retrieved November 25, 2023.
  15. ^ Steffens, Kate. "SJSU Research Guides: San Jose State Normal Training School History: Minns' Evening Normal School, 1857-1862". libguides.sjsu.edu. Retrieved November 25, 2023.
  16. ^ a b c d e f g h i j k l m n "SFSU Centennial History: Long Narrative of SF State". www.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 23, 2023.
  17. ^ "San Francisco State University Celebrates 100 Years of Opportunity and Academic Innovation in the Bay Area". www.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 25, 2023.
  18. ^ "SFSU Centennial History: 1899". www.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 25, 2023.
  19. ^ a b c d Eliassen, Meredith (October 3, 2007). San Francisco State University. Arcadia Publishing. ISBN 978-1-4396-3589-6.
  20. ^ a b c Pollak, Mark (November 16, 2018). The Playing Grounds of College Football: A Comprehensive Directory, 1869 to Today. McFarland. p. 346. ISBN 978-1-4766-3260-5.
  21. ^ "National Register #07001391: San Francisco State Teacher's College in San Francisco, California". noehill.com. Retrieved November 25, 2023.
  22. ^ "SAN FRANCISCO STATE TEACHER'S COLLEGE". CA State Parks. Retrieved November 25, 2023.
  23. ^ a b Project, Western Neighborhods. "Streetwise: Celebrating San Francisco State". www.outsidelands.org. Retrieved November 25, 2023.
  24. ^ Gerth, Donald R. (2010). The People's University: A History of the California State University. Berkeley Public Policy Press. ISBN 978-0-87772-435-3.
  25. ^ "San Francisco State University Celebrates 100 Years of Opportunity and Academic Innovation in the Bay Area". www.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 25, 2023.
  26. ^ a b c "A Revised History of the Experimental College - 1960's to present | SF State's Experimental College". ueap.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 26, 2023.
  27. ^ a b c d e f g h i j "San Francisco State College Strike Collection-Bibliography of Secondary Source Materials". November 29, 2014. Archived from the original on November 29, 2014. Retrieved November 25, 2023.
  28. ^ Anonymous (October 30, 2018). "San Francisco State University Black Student Union (BSU) Attack Gater campus newspaper editor, James Vaszko, San Francisco, CA, November 6, 1967". Cleveland Museum of Art. Retrieved November 25, 2023.
  29. ^ "Interview with Jim Vaszko - Bay Area Television Archive". diva.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 25, 2023.
  30. ^ "Bombs at SF State - Bay Area Television Archive". diva.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 30, 2023.
  31. ^ "SFSU Centennial History: 1978". www.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 25, 2023.
  32. ^ Archives, L. A. Times (May 14, 1985). "Ticking Bomb Found on Campus in San Francisco". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved November 30, 2023.
  33. ^ "San Francisco State College Campus Guide". Retrieved November 29, 2023.
  34. ^ "Bomb at SF State College - Bay Area Television Archive". diva.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 30, 2023.
  35. ^ Archives, L. A. Times (September 21, 1985). "S.F. Man Held in One Bombing, Three Attempts". Los Angeles Times. Retrieved November 30, 2023.
  36. ^ "United States of America, Plaintiff-appellee, v. Coy Ray Phelps, Defendant-appellant, 35 F.3d 573 (9th Cir. 1994)". Justia Law. Retrieved November 30, 2023.
  37. ^ a b Egelko, Bob (March 22, 2002). "Man's release a mistake, judge rules / Found insane, he escaped bomb charges". SF Gate. Retrieved November 29, 2023.
  38. ^ "Phelps v. United States, 92 F. App'x 539 | Casetext Search + Citator". casetext.com. Retrieved November 30, 2023.
  39. ^ "Inmate Locator". www.bop.gov. Retrieved November 30, 2023.
  40. ^ Judge, EDWARD M. CHEN, District. "U.S. v. PHELPS | No. CR-85-00899 EMC. | By EDWARD... | 20151125994| Leagle.com". Leagle. Retrieved November 30, 2023.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: multiple names: authors list (link)
  41. ^ a b Adams, Gerald D. (December 16, 1999). "S.F. State trumpets downtown campus". CT Insider. Retrieved November 23, 2023.
  42. ^ "Malcolm X Mural Is Marred Amid Dispute on Its Content". The New York Times. May 22, 1994.
  43. ^ "The Chronicle of Higher Education". chronicle.com. Archived from the original on April 30, 2009.
  44. ^ Lemonick, Michael D. (January 29, 1996). "IS SOMEONE OUT THERE?". Time. ISSN 0040-781X. Retrieved November 25, 2023.
  45. ^ "Space Scientist: Geoff Marcy and Paul Butler". Discover Magazine. Retrieved November 25, 2023.
  46. ^ Berlin, Kyran. "SF State evaluates new locations for Downtown Campus". Golden Gate Xpress. Retrieved November 25, 2023.
  47. ^ "SFSU fired whistleblower who exposed Science Building scandal". The San Francisco Examiner. Retrieved October 26, 2018.
  48. ^ "SFSU attorneys ordered to release Science Building scandal emails". The San Francisco Examiner. Retrieved October 26, 2018.
  49. ^ "Contractor Pleads Guilty to 118 Counts of Bribery Involving Former SFSU Official". sfappeal.com. Retrieved October 26, 2018.
  50. ^ Herrera, Jack. "10-day hunger strike = victory for SFSU students". USA TODAY. Retrieved November 25, 2023.
  51. ^ "Pilot Program Revives 1960s Experimental College at S.F. State". KQED. December 11, 2017. Retrieved November 26, 2023.
  52. ^ Pine, Dan (August 5, 2017). "Investigation: SF Hillel 'improperly excluded' from student fair". J. Retrieved November 25, 2023.
  53. ^ "A Reluctant Campus Acknowledges Zionism". Commentary Magazine. March 22, 2019. Retrieved November 25, 2023.
  54. ^ Egelko, By Bob (June 20, 2017). "Lawsuit says Jewish students 'intimidated' at SF State". San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved November 25, 2023.
  55. ^ Egelko, By Bob (March 15, 2022). "Tensions over ethnic studies continue at S.F. State as president vetoes faculty decision siding with professor". San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved November 25, 2023.
  56. ^ Martos, Shaylyn Cortney. "Protesters denounce CSU settlement over Zionism". Golden Gate Xpress. Retrieved November 25, 2023.
  57. ^ "Lynn Mahoney | CSU". www.calstate.edu. Retrieved November 25, 2023.
  58. ^ "Centennial Historical Presidents: Mary Ward". www.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 25, 2023.
  59. ^ "Whose Narratives? Gender, Justice, and Resistance - Event - Arab America". September 29, 2020. Archived from the original on September 29, 2020. Retrieved November 25, 2023.
  60. ^ Egelko, By Bob (March 15, 2022). "Tensions over ethnic studies continue at S.F. State as president vetoes faculty decision siding with professor". San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved November 25, 2023.
  61. ^ "Zoom refuses to stream university event featuring member of terrorist organization". September 27, 2020. Archived from the original on September 27, 2020. Retrieved November 25, 2023.
  62. ^ Vincent, James (September 24, 2020). "Zoom cancels talk by Palestinian hijacker Leila Khaled at San Francisco State University". The Verge. Retrieved November 25, 2023.
  63. ^ McLaughlin, Sarah (April 22, 2021). "Zoom cancels another academic event with Leila Khaled, again raising questions about company's role in the classroom". www.thefire.org. Retrieved November 25, 2023.
  64. ^ Greschler, Gabriel (September 4, 2020). "Palestinian hijacker Leila Khaled to speak at S.F. State". J. Retrieved November 25, 2023.
  65. ^ "New Downtown Campus - We Moved! | College of Professional & Global Education". cpage.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 23, 2023.
  66. ^ a b c Hernandez, Adriana (April 7, 2023). "Riley Gaines visit to SF State results in trans-rights activist protest". Golden Gate Xpress. Archived from the original on April 8, 2023. Retrieved April 8, 2023.
  67. ^ Ross, Alexandra (March 28, 2023). "'Spiritual warfare': Riley Gaines speaks against trans women in women's sports at on-campus event". The Pitt News. Archived from the original on April 5, 2023. Retrieved April 8, 2023.
  68. ^ a b c d Regimbal, Alec (April 7, 2023). "Anti-Lia Thomas activist whisked away by police amid protest at San Francisco State". SFGATE. Archived from the original on April 7, 2023. Retrieved April 8, 2023.
  69. ^ a b "Former college swimmer says she was assaulted at an event opposing the inclusion of trans women in women's sports". CNN. April 7, 2023.
  70. ^ Hernandez, Adriana. "'Stop the hike,' SFSU students oppose tuition increase". Golden Gate Xpress. Retrieved November 25, 2023.
  71. ^ "Multi-Year Tuition Proposal | CSU". www.calstate.edu. Retrieved November 25, 2023.
  72. ^ "Facing $1.5B deficit, California State University to hike tuition 6% annually for next 5 years". AP News. September 13, 2023. Retrieved November 25, 2023.
  73. ^ King, Stephanie. "Budget cuts hit all colleges totaling over $11 million". Golden Gate Xpress. Retrieved November 25, 2023.
  74. ^ "University Budget Committee August 31, 2023 Presentation" (PDF). University Budget Committee. August 31, 2023. Retrieved November 25, 2023.
  75. ^ Singh, Preetina (October 12, 2023). "Organizing Against Massive Layoffs at San Francisco State University". California Faculty Association. Retrieved November 25, 2023.
  76. ^ Osborn, Sophia. "CFA rally against tuition increase and working conditions". Golden Gate Xpress. Retrieved November 25, 2023.
  77. ^ Osborn, Sophia. "CFA rally at SFSU for a better contract amidst vote to strike". Golden Gate Xpress. Retrieved November 25, 2023.
  78. ^ Pratap, Ishaan. "CFA hosts rally to save SFSU faculty jobs". Golden Gate Xpress. Retrieved November 25, 2023.
  79. ^ Osborn, Sophia. "SFSU walkout of class to call ceasefire in Gaza". Golden Gate Xpress. Retrieved November 25, 2023.
  80. ^ "Walkouts Protesting 'Gaza Genocide' Planned on Campuses Across U.S." Haaretz. Retrieved November 25, 2023.
  81. ^ Arbona, Catie (November 16, 2023). "Teamsters Show our POWER on Strike!". Teamsters Local 2010. Retrieved November 25, 2023.
  82. ^ Osborn, Sophia. "Teamsters 2010 Union goes on strike". Golden Gate Xpress. Retrieved November 25, 2023.
  83. ^ Hernandez, Jason. "Gators bite back in latest walkout". Golden Gate Xpress. Retrieved November 30, 2023.
  84. ^ "California Faculty Association Instagram Post". November 9, 2023. Retrieved November 25, 2023.
  85. ^ Osborn, Sophia, The other side: Q&A With CFA-SFSU Brad Erickson, retrieved November 25, 2023
  86. ^ Hoover, Ken (March 21, 1999). "1899–1999 '100 Years of Opportunity' A century and 185,020 degrees after its humble beginnings, San Francisco State University proudly celebrates its legacy of service, activism and diversity". San Francisco Chronicle. pp. SC-1. Retrieved December 10, 2009.
  87. ^ Eliassen, Meredith (February 1, 2019). "San Francisco State University Archives". California History. 96 (1): 33–45. doi:10.1525/ch.2019.96.1.33. ISSN 0162-2897. S2CID 166317280.
  88. ^ Centennial Historical Presidents, San Francisco State University
  89. ^ "President Mary A. Ward". University Communications, SFSU.
  90. ^ "J. Paul Leonard, 93, University President". The New York Times. March 1, 1995. ISSN 0362-4331. Retrieved August 4, 2022.
  91. ^ "Dr. Glenn S. Dumke, 72, Is Dead; Was California Universities' Head". The New York Times. July 1, 1989. Retrieved November 23, 2008.
  92. ^ Asimov, Nanette (May 11, 2012). "Leslie Wong is named president of S.F. State". SFGATE. San Francisco. Retrieved August 13, 2018.
  93. ^ "Lynn Mahoney Appointed President of San Francisco State University". May 22, 2019.
  94. ^ "Academic Calendar - SF State University". webapps.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 23, 2023.
  95. ^ "Office of Student Financial Aid | San Francisco State University". financialaid.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 26, 2023.
  96. ^ "San Francisco State University". U.S. News & World Report. Retrieved September 21, 2017.
  97. ^ "College of Liberal & Creative Arts | San Francisco State University". lca.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 27, 2023.
  98. ^ "Innovate Sustainably. Lead Responsibly. | Lam Family College of Business". cob.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 27, 2023.
  99. ^ "College of Ethnic Studies | San Francisco State University". ethnicstudies.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 27, 2023.
  100. ^ "College of Health & Social Sciences | San Francisco State University". chss.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 27, 2023.
  101. ^ "The College of Science & Engineering (CoSE) | College of Science & Engineering". cose.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 27, 2023.
  102. ^ "Graduate College of Education | San Francisco State University". gcoe.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 27, 2023.
  103. ^ "College of Professional and Global Education (CPaGE) | San Francisco State University | Bay Area, California Continuing Education / Extension Classes + Certificates". cpage.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 27, 2023.
  104. ^ "Visit SF State - Fast Facts". SFSU.edu. Archived from the original on September 3, 2017. Retrieved September 23, 2017.
  105. ^ "EXCO Courses". ueap.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 26, 2023.
  106. ^ "EXCO Past Courses Fall 2023 | SF State's Experimental College". ueap.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 26, 2023.
  107. ^ "Undergraduate Education and Academic Planning | Undergraduate Education and Academic Planning". ueap.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 26, 2023.
  108. ^ "SF State Scholars (Blended Bachelor's +Master's) Programs | Division of Graduate Studies & Career Development". grad.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 25, 2023.
  109. ^ "Find Your Graduate Program | Division of Graduate Studies & Career Development". grad.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 25, 2023.
  110. ^ "Joint Doctorate in Special Education | Department of Special Education". sped.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 25, 2023.
  111. ^ "SF State WASC Accreditation".
  112. ^ "SF State AACSB Accreditation".
  113. ^ "Abet-Accredited Programs: San Francisco State University".
  114. ^ a b "College Navigator - San Francisco State University". nces.ed.gov. Retrieved November 25, 2023.
  115. ^ "How To Apply | Division of Graduate Studies & Career Development". grad.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 25, 2023.
  116. ^ "College Navigator - San Francisco State University". nces.ed.gov. Retrieved November 25, 2023.
  117. ^ "Forbes America's Top Colleges List 2023". Forbes. Retrieved September 22, 2023.
  118. ^ "Wall Street Journal/Times Higher Education College Rankings 2022". The Wall Street Journal/Times Higher Education. Retrieved July 26, 2022.
  119. ^ "2023-2024 Best National Universities". U.S. News & World Report. Retrieved September 22, 2023.
  120. ^ "2022 National University Rankings". Washington Monthly. Retrieved September 13, 2022.
  121. ^ "2022-23 Best Global Universities Rankings". U.S. News & World Report. Retrieved February 25, 2023.
  122. ^ "California State University - San Francisco Rankings". U.S. News & World Report. Retrieved September 12, 2022.
  123. ^ "San Francisco - U.S. News Best Grad School Rankings". U.S. News & World Report. Retrieved September 24, 2020.
  124. ^ "Social Mobility Index". Social Mobility Index. CollegeNET and PayScale. 2020. Retrieved November 12, 2021.
  125. ^ "Graduate Philosophy Department Ranks #8 Nationwide". Archived from the original on May 21, 2018. Retrieved May 20, 2018.
  126. ^ a b c "Programs - San Francisco State University". Sfsu.edu. Archived from the original on December 5, 2013. Retrieved February 5, 2014.
  127. ^ "Schools & Departments". Retrieved May 24, 2018.
  128. ^ a b "San Francisco impact report". Calstate.edu. Retrieved November 4, 2011.
  129. ^ "Entertainment Education Report: The Best Film Schools for 2019". Variety. 2019. Retrieved July 13, 2019.
  130. ^ "The Top 25 American Film Schools, Ranked". The Hollywood Reporter. August 15, 2019.
  131. ^ McGrane, Sally (August 26, 2001). "Family Matters / Learning about relatives -- near and far -- expands our sense of self". SFGATE. San Francisco. Retrieved September 23, 2017.
  132. ^ "Wall Street Journal ranks SF State top 5 for diversity nationwide | SF State News". news.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 26, 2023.
  133. ^ "Top Colleges in the West for Diversity". Wall Street Journal. November 17, 2021. ISSN 0099-9660. Retrieved November 26, 2023.
  134. ^ "Ethnicity Enrollment Profile". www.calstate.edu. Archived from the original on October 25, 2019. Retrieved July 9, 2019.
  135. ^ a b c d e "Welcome | Campus Maps". maps.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 27, 2023.
  136. ^ "Science & Engineering Innovation Center | School of Engineering". engineering.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 23, 2023.
  137. ^ "Welcome to DineOnCampus at San Francisco State University by Chartwells Higher Education". Dineoncampus.com. Retrieved November 4, 2011.
  138. ^ "Dining Center – SF State University Property Management". Sfsu.edu. Archived from the original on September 7, 2011. Retrieved November 4, 2011.
  139. ^ "Manzanita Square | University Housing". housing.sfsu.edu. Retrieved December 24, 2020.
  140. ^ a b "Mary Park and Mary Ward Residence Halls – SF State University Property Management". Sfsu.edu. Archived from the original on November 17, 2011. Retrieved November 4, 2011.
  141. ^ "Towers at Centennial Square". Archived from the original on June 2, 2017. Retrieved June 4, 2017.
  142. ^ "Towers at Centennial Square – SF State University Property Management". Sfsu.edu. Archived from the original on November 17, 2011. Retrieved November 4, 2011.
  143. ^ "Village at Centennial Square – SF State University Property Management". Sfsu.edu. Archived from the original on November 17, 2011. Retrieved November 4, 2011.
  144. ^ "University Park North". Archived from the original on June 3, 2008. Retrieved June 18, 2008.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: bot: original URL status unknown (link)
  145. ^ "University Park South". Archived from the original on February 20, 2009. Retrieved June 18, 2008.{{cite web}}: CS1 maint: bot: original URL status unknown (link)
  146. ^ a b c "West Campus Green Site Development | Capital Planning, Design and Construction". cpdc.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 23, 2023.
  147. ^ Levy, Dan (March 29, 1999). "Old Dorm Reduced To Dust / Thousands watch implosion at S.F. State". San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved January 27, 2017.
  148. ^ "Meeting and Conference Facilities- Seven Hills – SF State University Property Management". Sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 4, 2011.
  149. ^ "Student Life Events Center | Student Activities & Events". activities.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 27, 2023.
  150. ^ "Meeting and Conference Facilities-Towers – SF State University Property Management". Sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 4, 2011.
  151. ^ "Cesar Chavez Student Center". Associated Students. Retrieved November 27, 2023.
  152. ^ "Early Childhood Education Center". Associated Students. Retrieved November 27, 2023.
  153. ^ a b "Downtown Campus | San Francisco State University | College of Professional & Global Education". cpage.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 23, 2023.
  154. ^ "San Francisco State University Downtown Campus | Lam Family College of Business". cob.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 27, 2023.
  155. ^ Berlin, Kyran. "SF State evaluates new locations for Downtown Campus". Golden Gate Xpress. Retrieved November 23, 2023.
  156. ^ "San Francisco State University Downtown Campus | Lam Family College of Business". cob.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 27, 2023.
  157. ^ "February 13, 2023 | CampusMemo". campusmemo.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 27, 2023.
  158. ^ "Contact | Sierra Nevada Field Campus". sierra.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 27, 2023.
  159. ^ "Welcome to the San Francisco State Sierra Nevada Field Campus". SF State Sierra Nevada Field Campus. Retrieved December 15, 2021.
  160. ^ a b "Classes & Workshops | Sierra Nevada Field Campus". sierra.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 27, 2023.
  161. ^ "Scholarships | Sierra Nevada Field Campus". sierra.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 27, 2023.
  162. ^ "FAQs | Sierra Nevada Field Campus". sierra.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 27, 2023.
  163. ^ "Gallery | Sierra Nevada Field Campus". sierra.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 27, 2023.
  164. ^ "Sierra Nevada Field Campus | Sierra Nevada Field Campus". sierra.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 27, 2023.
  165. ^ "Worldwide Elevation Finder". elevation.maplogs.com. Retrieved November 27, 2023.
  166. ^ "Friends of the Sierra Nevada Field Campus – photo by Sarah Rabkin". friendsofsnfc.org. Retrieved November 27, 2023.
  167. ^ "Sierra Nevada Field Campus · 35400 CA-49, Sierra City, CA 96124". Sierra Nevada Field Campus · 35400 CA-49, Sierra City, CA 96124. Retrieved November 27, 2023.
  168. ^ "Romberg Tiburon Campus". Estuary & Ocean Science Center. Retrieved September 15, 2021.
  169. ^ Lang, Gretchen (June 29, 2022). "The Ark | Marine center's new director hopeful amid funding challenges". The Ark. Retrieved November 27, 2023.
  170. ^ a b "Director's Message | Estuary & Ocean Science Center". eoscenter.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 27, 2023.
  171. ^ a b c Alexander, Kurtis (June 10, 2023). "The only marine science lab on San Francisco Bay is at risk of closing. Here's what's at stake". San Francisco Chronicle. Retrieved November 23, 2023.
  172. ^ "Campus Planning at San Francisco State University | Campus Planning". plan.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 27, 2023.
  173. ^ "Romberg Tiburon Campus Master Plan | Campus Planning". plan.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 27, 2023.
  174. ^ "Estuary & Ocean Science Center | Facilities Services". facilities.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 27, 2023.
  175. ^ "Visit Our Offices | San Francisco Bay National Estuarine Research Reserve". sfbaynerr.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 27, 2023.
  176. ^ "Bay Conference Center | Estuary & Ocean Science Center". eoscenter.sfsu.edu. Retrieved September 15, 2021.
  177. ^ "WRE | Season concludes at NCAA Regionals". SF State Athletics. February 24, 2017. Retrieved March 28, 2017.
  178. ^ "Championships Summary" (PDF). National Collegiate Athletic Association. Retrieved May 20, 2018.
  179. ^ "Division II Wrestling Championships Records Book" (PDF). National Collegiate Athletic Association. Retrieved August 19, 2019.
  180. ^ "Alli the Gator | New Student & Family Programs". newstudentprograms.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 28, 2023.
  181. ^ SFSU Centennial History, San Francisco State University
  182. ^ "Mascot - SFSU" (PDF). Sfsu.edu. Archived from the original (PDF) on March 3, 2016. Retrieved January 12, 2018.
  183. ^ "Alli Gator gets a glow up | SF State News". news.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 23, 2023.
  184. ^ "IMLeagues". www.imleagues.com. Retrieved November 28, 2023.
  185. ^ "Sports | Campus Recreation". campusrec.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 28, 2023.
  186. ^ "Sport Clubs | Campus Recreation". campusrec.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 28, 2023.
  187. ^ "- GatorXperience". sfsu.campuslabs.com. Retrieved November 23, 2023.
  188. ^ "Reregister a Club/Organization | Student Activities & Events". activities.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 26, 2023.
  189. ^ "Greek Life at SF State | Student Activities & Events". activities.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 23, 2023.
  190. ^ "Residential Community Overview | University Housing". housing.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 23, 2023.
  191. ^ "Welcome to Manzanita Square! | University Housing". housing.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 23, 2023.
  192. ^ a b "Student Health Services | San Francisco State University". health.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 27, 2023.
  193. ^ "Nutrition Clinic | Health Promotion & Wellness". wellness.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 27, 2023.
  194. ^ "Student Health Services | CSU". www.calstate.edu. Retrieved November 27, 2023.
  195. ^ "Frequently Asked Questions | Student Health Services". health.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 27, 2023.
  196. ^ "Welcome to GatorHealth & Well-being | Gator Health". gatorhealth.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 27, 2023.
  197. ^ "Counseling Services | Counseling & Psychological Services". caps.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 27, 2023.
  198. ^ "Clinic Training Program | Counseling & Psychological Services". caps.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 27, 2023.
  199. ^ "Peggy H. Smith Graduate Training Clinic | Counseling & Psychological Services". caps.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 27, 2023.
  200. ^ "Basic Needs Initiatives | University Development". develop.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 27, 2023.
  201. ^ "Welcome to Food+Shelter+Success | Food+Shelter+Success". basicneeds.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 27, 2023.
  202. ^ "Zen Den | Food+Shelter+Success". basicneeds.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 27, 2023.
  203. ^ "SFSU Wellness Map". Google My Maps. Retrieved November 27, 2023.
  204. ^ a b "Green-designed Mashouf Wellness Center opens its doors | SF State News". news.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 26, 2023.
  205. ^ Dunaway, Dayvon. "Future wellness center named after alumni donor". Golden Gate Xpress. Retrieved November 26, 2023.
  206. ^ "Mashouf Wellness Center | Campus Recreation". campusrec.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 26, 2023.
  207. ^ "San Francisco State University Mashouf Wellness Center". WRNS Studio. Retrieved November 27, 2023.
  208. ^ "Gymnasium | Campus Recreation". campusrec.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 27, 2023.
  209. ^ "Search Programs - San Francisco State University Recreation Portal". member.campusrec.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 28, 2023.
  210. ^ "Gator Outdoor Adventures | Campus Recreation". campusrec.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 28, 2023.
  211. ^ a b "Associated Students: Your Student Government | Dean of Students (DOS)". dos.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 26, 2023.
  212. ^ "Associated Students". Associated Students. Retrieved November 26, 2023.
  213. ^ "Cesar Chavez Student Center". Associated Students. Retrieved November 26, 2023.
  214. ^ Vines, Isabella. "SF State Muslim students unhappy with shared prayer room, fight for their own space". Golden Gate Xpress. Retrieved November 26, 2023.
  215. ^ "Art Gallery". Associated Students. Retrieved November 26, 2023.
  216. ^ "Early Childhood Education Center". Associated Students. Retrieved November 26, 2023.
  217. ^ "Gator Groceries". Associated Students. Retrieved November 26, 2023.
  218. ^ "Farmers Market". Associated Students. Retrieved November 26, 2023.
  219. ^ "San Francisco 1966 Folk Festival Photos and Premium High Res Pictures - Getty Images".
  220. ^ *https://newspaperarchive.com/lowell-sun-may-02-1966-p-2/
  221. ^ *https://www.nicholasjennings.com/1968-the-year-of-lightfoot-s-u-s-breakthrough
  222. ^ "That Be-Bop-A-Lula Cat – Jungle Records".
  223. ^ "Digital Collections - Libraries - Northwestern University".
  224. ^ "GatorFest! 2023 || All Gators Are Welcome! | New Student & Family Programs". newstudentprograms.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 28, 2023.
  225. ^ "Upcoming GatorFest! Events | New Student & Family Programs". newstudentprograms.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 28, 2023.
  226. ^ "Golden Gate Xpress". Golden Gate Xpress. Retrieved November 25, 2023.
  227. ^ "ABOUT". Golden Gate Xpress. Retrieved November 25, 2023.
  228. ^ a b "Department of Journalism | College of Liberal & Creative Arts". journalism.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 27, 2023.
  229. ^ "Xpress Magazine". Xpress Magazine. Retrieved November 25, 2023.
  230. ^ *"SF State News". www.sfsu.edu. Retrieved September 10, 2018.
  231. ^ *"KSFS". sfsu.edu. April 6, 2005. Archived from the original on April 6, 2005. Retrieved September 10, 2018 – via archive.org.
  232. ^ "SF State Magazine | San Francisco State University". magazine.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 25, 2023.
  233. ^ "SF State Magazine | SF State News". news.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 25, 2023.
  234. ^ "Alumni & Student Publications & Department Publications | Department of Creative Writing". creativewriting.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 25, 2023.
  235. ^ "Alumni & Student Publications & Department Publications | Department of Creative Writing". creativewriting.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 25, 2023.
  236. ^ "Transfer 119.pdf". Google Docs. Retrieved November 25, 2023.
  237. ^ "About". Transfer Magazine. Retrieved November 25, 2023.
  238. ^ "Student Publications | Department of Women and Gender Studies". wgsdept.sfsu.edu. Retrieved November 25, 2023.

External links[edit]

37°43′24″N 122°28′47″W / 37.72333°N 122.47972°W / 37.72333; -122.47972